UCL School of Management

Organisations & Innovation

The faculty in this group share a common interest in the social psychology of individuals, teams, social networks, and processes within organizations. Topics of interest include creativity, innovation, leadership, negotiations, personality, decision-making, cooperation and competition. Our methods for data collection and analysis are diverse, including survey research, interviews, social psychology experiments, inductive qualitative research, multi-method field studies, and network analyses. Despite this diversity, there is a common focus on understanding individual and team outcomes within organizations.

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN WORKPLACE

I examine the effect of gender on a wide set of organizational outcomes such as perceptions, attitudes, performance.

Team Leadership

Team leadership is not only the domain of individual team leaders. Authority for key leadership functions can be shared over time.

Creativity, Improvisation, and Organizations

Not all creativity in organizations is planned -- improvisation plays a key role in contemporary organizational life

Helping Creative Teams

Teams doing creative work often need external help. Who do they go to?

Timing of Team Coaching Interventions

When to intervene to help a team can be as important as what to do.

Helping Creative Teams

This research explores how design teams get help over time and the characteristics of the most helpful help and helpers.

The effects of perspective-taking on creativity

Despite the plethora of positive outcomes associated with taking others' perspectives, perspective-taking stifles original idea generation.

The consequences of engaging in creative work

Rather than researching creativity as an outcome, we explore the positive and negative consequences of engaging in creative work.

Decision making processes in healthcare teams

Examining healthcare decisions in multi-disciplinary cancer care teams

Interdependence and organizational decisions

How and why do organizational decision makers, in personnel decisions, differently evaluate candidates from different social groups?